World Production of Non-Orange Citrus

Ernie Neff Crop Forecast, International

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) recently reported on expected world production of tangerines/mandarins, grapefruit and lemons/limes in the 2020-21 marketing year.

TANGERINES/MANDARINS
Global output for 2020-21 is estimated to rise 4% to a record 33.3 million tons with growth expected in nearly every market.

China’s production is projected to rise 1 million tons to a record 23 million tons due to favorable weather and rapid expansion in crop area devoted to newer easy-to-peel varieties.

Output in the European Union is expected to rise 597,000 tons to 3.4 million tons as a result of higher
production in Spain and Italy due to favorable weather conditions.

Turkey’s production is estimated to be up 14% to 1.6 million tons due to favorable timing of rains and temperatures.

Moroccon output is projected to jump nearly one-third to 1.2 million tons due to favorable weather during the flowering period.

Output in the United States is expected to rise 6% to 909,000 tons due to favorable weather.

GRAPEFRUIT
Global production in 2020-21 is estimated to be down less than 1% to 6.7 million tons due to
unfavorable weather in the United States and Turkey that more than offset higher production in China, Mexico and South Africa.

LEMONS/LIMES
Global output in 2020-21 is estimated to be flat at 8.4 million tons as increased production in Mexico, the European Union and Turkey nearly offset declines in Argentina and the United States. This is the first production decrease in three years for the United States, with the drop attributed to lower yield in California’s San Joaquin Valley due to drought.

The FAS noted that total U.S. citrus production is estimated to drop 13% in line with a long-term decline. It pointed out that citrus greening has been a key factor in the U.S. citrus decline, with output less than one-third of what it was 20 years ago.

See the full FAS report.

Source: The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service

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