Fruit Fly Quarantine Actions in California

Jim Rogers Pests, Regulation

Portions of Contra Costa and Santa Clara counties in California have been placed under quarantine for the Oriental fruit fly (OFF), and a quarantine in Orange County has been removed. See the updated quarantine map here. CONTRA COSTA COUNTYIn Contra Costa County, detections near the cities of Brentwood and Oakley have resulted in a quarantine zone covering 99 square miles. …

Peace River Growers See Hopeful Signs in Groves

Jim Rogers Events, HLB Management, Pests

The Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association hosted a grower forum in September to discuss how trees are looking after the first application of oxytetracycline (OTC) has been injected. The event had a good turnout, and growers were mostly optimistic about what they are seeing in groves. Nearly all in attendance have treated at least some portion of their acreage …

Improved Lebbeck Mealybug Detection

Jim Rogers Pests

The U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA ARS) scientists and research partners have found a faster, safer and less expensive way for growers to detect the invasive lebbeck mealybug. A recent study published in Journal of Applied Entomology describes their work. The lebbeck mealybug (Nipaecoccus viridis) feeds on and damages various citrus fruit and ornamental plants. The invasive species …

Tau Fruit Fly Quarantine Expanded

Jim Rogers California Corner, Pests, Regulation

Federal and state agriculture agencies on Aug. 15 expanded the Zeugodacus tau fruit fly quarantine in the Stevenson Ranch area of Los Angeles County, California. The action was taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS) and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA). The expansion was in response to the confirmed …

Diaprepes root wevil

Diaprepes Root Weevil Update for Florida

Jim Rogers Pests

Florida’s populations of Diaprepes abbreviatus root weevil have been uncharacteristically low so far in 2023, entomologist Lauren Diepenbrock reported recently. The adult pests are normally active in April–May and in the fall, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences assistant professor noted. Prior to the discovery of HLB disease in Florida in 2005, growers who had extensive …

Yellow-Legged Hornet Poses Threat to Pollinators

Jim Rogers Georgia, Pests

A yellow-legged hornet (Vespa velutina), which poses a threat to honeybees and other pollinators, was recently detected near Savannah, Georgia. This is the first time a live specimen of this species has been detected in the United States. Its presence was confirmed by the Georgia Department of Agriculture (GDA), in coordination with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant …

Developing Management for a New Snail Pest

Jim Rogers Pests

By Lauren Diepenbrock A recently established snail species, Bulimulus bonariensis (also known as Bulimulus sporadicus), has been growing in population throughout the Southeast for the past few years. Growers first reported concerns about this snail in 2020 when they found the pest covering microjets and interfering with irrigation in the late spring/early summer (Figure 1). At the time, it was …

First Tau Fruit Fly Quarantine in Western Hemisphere

Jim Rogers California Corner, Pests, Regulation

A portion of Los Angeles County has been placed under quarantine for the Tau fruit fly (Zeugodacus tau group) following the detection of more than 20 flies in the unincorporated area of Stevenson Ranch, near the city of Santa Clarita. The fly has a very wide host range, including numerous citrus varieties as well as a select range of native …

Biologically-Based Management of Citrus Pests

Jim Rogers Biologicals, Pests, Tip of the Week

By Jawwad Qureshi Management of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Figure 1) is critical because it is responsible for spreading huanglongbing (HLB) disease. Although HLB is established in Florida, it continues to spread through ACP feeding in already infected trees and by infecting newly planted young trees. Some ACP control occurs naturally in the environment by beneficial organisms such as …

Eliminate Fire Ants to Improve ACP Control

Jim Rogers Biologicals, Pests

By Lukasz Stelinski Ants can be involved in mutualistic relationships with honeydew-producing hemipterans. Ants provide protection against their natural enemies, and in return, hemipterans reward ants with honeydew. Such mutualism may affect population regulation of hemipterans by third trophic level predators. However, current knowledge regarding the effects of this food-for-protection mutualism of ants with Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri) …

Citrus Root Weevil Intercepted

Jim Rogers Pests

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists intercepted a species of citrus root weevil for the first time in Wilmington, Delaware, on May 22. They found the Cleistolophus viridimargo (Champion, 1911) weevil, a significant actionable pest, while inspecting a shipment of pineapples from Honduras. CBP said citrus root weevils pose a serious threat to the $3.4 billion U.S. citrus …

Sting Nematode Problematic for Young Trees

Jim Rogers Pests

The sting nematode is the most serious nematode problem in young citrus groves, nematologist Larry Duncan reported at the Florida Citrus Growers’ Institute in April. According to Duncan, long before HLB, the sting nematode was widely encountered in groves on Florida’s Central Ridge and in Polk County. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences professor said tree …

Antibiotics, HLB and Psyllids

Jim Rogers HLB Management, Pests

Entomologist Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski recently shared findings from trials on the use of foliar-applied and trunk-injected antibiotics for controlling HLB and the Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) that spread the disease. Pelz-Stelinski is associate center director at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Citrus Research and Education Center (CREC) in Lake Alfred.  In a May 17 presentation …

Update on Snail Management in Citrus

Jim Rogers Pests, Tip of the Week

By Lauren Diepenbrock Snail management is becoming a more common discussion in Florida citrus with the arrival of a newer species (Bulimulus bonariensis, previously referred to as Bulimulus sporadicus, Figure 1) in the Southeast. This snail is a new challenge for citrus growers. With funding from the Citrus Research and Development Foundation, the University of Florida Institute of Food and …

Managing Citrus Thrips in California

Jim Rogers California Corner, Pests

In California’s Central Valley, citrus thrips are one of the most concerning pests for growers. Citrus thrips feed on young fruit, which results in scarring damage. “Those cuts are then downgraded in the packinghouse, costing our growers money, which is why managing thrips is so important,” said Sandipa Gautam, University of California Cooperative Extension area citrus integrated pest management advisor. …

Citrus Pest Management Course Offered

Jim Rogers Education, Pests

Citrus industry workers interested in learning more about citrus pest management are encouraged to enroll in Citrus Pest Management, a 16-week course taught by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) faculty in the fall of 2023. The class provides a comprehensive overview of citrus pests and how best to manage them in today’s citrus greening environment. …

Monitor and Manage Ambrosia Beetles

Jim Rogers Pests

Winter Storm Elliott brought freezing temperatures to the Florida Panhandle Dec. 24–28, 2022, resulting in significant damage to citrus in the cold-hardy growing region. Trees that received significant freeze damage are more vulnerable to pests and diseases. Ambrosia beetles are among the pests being seen as a result of the storm. Because ambrosia beetles generally prefer dead or dying trees, …

Lebbeck Mealybug Problematic for Florida Citrus

Jim Rogers Pests

The lebbeck mealybug, also known as the hibiscus mealybug, is a pest that has recently become problematic for Florida citrus growers. Extension agent Lourdes Perez Cordero and entomologist Lauren Diepenbrock, both with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), recently reported on the pest. According to Cordero and Diepenbrock, the lebbeck mealybug feeds by piercing the …

New Twist Added to Psyllid Control

Jim Rogers HLB Management, Pests

Lukasz Stelinski for years has promoted saving money on HLB control by spraying for Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) only when their populations reach a certain threshold. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences professor still promotes that concept, but with a slightly new twist. TRUNK INJECTION SHOWING PROMISEIn a virtual seminar on April 25, Stelinski advised growers …

Late Start for California Red Scale

Jim Rogers California Corner, Pests

This year’s first male flight of California red scale is noticeably later than in prior years, according to Sandipa Gautam, area citrus integrated pest management advisor for University of California Cooperative Extension. The cold and wet winter has had a notable impact on pest populations. “Usually, March 1 is tentatively the time when we see the first male flight in …