Rootstock Trial Results on New Website

Tacy CalliesRootstocks

rootstock

A new website with a wealth of information about citrus rootstocks is now available at https://citrusrootstocks.org/. Rootstock breeder Kim Bowman, with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service in Fort Pierce, has posted results from 37 replicated multiyear rootstock field trials in Florida. The results can be easily accessed from the site by computer, tablet or smartphone. 

According to Bowman, the trials include many of the most popular rootstocks in Florida and the rootstocks released by USDA over the past 20 years. Also included are more than 300 of the SuperSour rootstocks currently being evaluated for potential release in the next few years. The new website is the best source to find specific trial results comparing US-942, US-897, US-802, US-812, US-852, US-896, US-1516, US-1279, US-1281, US-1282, US-1283, US-1284, SuperSour 1, SuperSour 2, SuperSour 3, Swingle, sour orange and many other new and common rootstocks. 

The trial results will be the basis for future releases of USDA rootstocks, says Bowman. Information growers can examine on the website includes numerical data on tree survival, tree size, canopy health, fruit yield, fruit size, Brix, acid, juice percentage and color.

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“In addition to extensive field performance information for hundreds of rootstocks, the site contains official rootstock descriptions for many in commercial use, specific information about nursery propagation for all the USDA rootstocks, the latest statistics for industry usage of different rootstocks, links to an assortment of other invaluable rootstock-related sites and much more,” says Bowman.

He says new updates will be added to the site regularly, but there is already a tremendous amount of information on the site that’s ready to be used.

“Take advantage of the site when you are looking for the latest, most complete information on new rootstocks. Remember that your choice of rootstock can make the difference between a profitable grove and a planting that fails,” concludes Bowman.

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About the Author
Tacy Callies

Tacy Callies

Editor of Citrus Industry magazine

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