Citrus Root Structures: Lessons From Below

Jim Rogers Research, Root health

By Ute Albrecht There have been numerous reports of malformed roots in field-grown citrus trees recently. The rootstock propagation method is often suspected as the culprit. Before drawing quick conclusions, it is important to recognize that there are many different factors that can influence the root structure of a citrus tree aside from the propagation method. These include the genetic …

Does Compost Improve Young Tree Growth?

Jim Rogers Research, Root health, Soil Improvement

By Ute Albrecht, Gabriel Pugina, Antonio Castellano-Hinojosa and Sarah Strauss Root health is important for tree growth and directly affects a tree’s ability to cope with adverse biotic and abiotic stresses. Most citrus production in Florida occurs on natural infertile sands with very little organic matter and a low cation exchange capacity (CEC), resulting in minimal amounts of soluble nutrients …

Use Physical Barriers for Root Health

Jim Rogers IPCs, Root health, Tip of the Week

By Larry Duncan Citrus trees in Florida soils infested with diaprepes root weevil (Diaprepes abbreviatus) or sting nematode (Belonolaimus longicaudatus) frequently contend with devastating damage to their root systems. This is made even worse by root loss due to huanglongbing (HLB) disease. Where soil conditions are conducive to the insect or nematode, it is very difficult to prevent major economic …

Rooting Problems in Citrus Trees

Tacy Callies Root health

Rooting issues in citrus containers were a major problem this year for growers in Georgia. Kim Jones, who farms citrus in Georgia and Florida, implores producers to inspect their trees extensively before planting them. He said there were various reports of j-rooting and circle-rooting in container plants. Trees with these problems are more vulnerable to high-stress environmental conditions if left …

Root Depth Isn’t What It Used To Be

Tacy Callies Root health

By Evan Johnson, Tanyaradzwa Chinyukwi, Lorenzo Rossi and Davie Kadyampakeni Huanglongbing’s (HLB) detrimental effect on roots has changed how we think about root health and horticultural management of citrus in Florida. As part of the work studying nutritional responses described in Effect of Nutrients on Canopy Response and Yield, we are studying the effects of macronutrient and micronutrient fertilization on …

Effects of Grower Tools on Citrus Diseases and Roots

Ashley Robinson Diseases, Root health

Citrus researchers at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) are taking a more comprehensive look at how tools to manage HLB affect young trees. The goal is to develop integrated approaches and update management practices for growers. After one year of the research project, some interesting results are already emerging. The research project, “Establishing Healthy …

crisp

Improving Root Health in the Era of HLB

Ashley Robinson Root health

Developing and maintaining a healthy root system is crucial for establishment and long-term productivity of citrus trees. The presence of HLB can greatly complicate citrus root-health management. The infection causes severe damage to fibrous roots that amplify the detrimental effects caused by other root pests and pathogens, such as phytophthora root rot. Due to HLB’s widespread presence throughout Florida, root-health …

Root Architecture, Propagation Method and Citrus Tree Growth

Tacy Callies Root health

By Ute Albrecht, Sameer Pokhrel and Kim D. Bowman The rootstock has received increased attention as a management strategy to alleviate the devastating effects of HLB. In commercial citrus nursery production, rootstocks are typically propagated by seed. This is possible because citrus produces polyembryonic seeds with nucellar embryos, which develop into plants that are genetically identical to the mother plant. …

HLB and Citrus Root Health

Ernie Neff HLB Management, Root health

“We’re not going to have a silver bullet” for HLB, says Lorenzo Rossi, an assistant professor at the Indian River Research and Education Center. Instead, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) root biologist says that researchers are trying to keep citrus producing profitably. Rossi described some of his research efforts that focus on root health …

HLB

Root Health Update

Ernie Neff Root health

Evan Johnson, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) plant pathologist at the Citrus Research and Education Center, updates efforts to help citrus tree roots cope with HLB. He starts by noting that around 10 years ago he and former UF/IFAS researcher Jim Graham discovered “that HLB causes severe damage to the root system.” They hoped …

citrus trees

Newly Planted Trees and HLB

Ernie Neff HLB Management, Root health

Newly planted trees need to have root systems that are as established, robust and healthy as possible before contracting HLB, Evan Johnson told growers at Citrus Expo. That’s because HLB takes out a tree’s fibrous root system and causes dieback of the structural root system. Having strong root systems from the start will increase the productive life of trees, the …

Studying Citrus Roots in the HLB Era

Tacy Callies Root health

By Lorenzo Rossi, Ute Albrecht and Evan Johnson Citrus root systems are confronted with many challenges that limit resource availability needed for tree productivity. Challenges are compounded by huanglongbing (HLB), which now affects nearly all citrus trees throughout Florida’s production areas. Contrary to the above-ground portion of the tree, study of the below-ground portion is considerably more difficult. This article …

Strategies for Stronger Roots

Tacy Callies Root health

Citrus growers discuss production practices to improve root health. By Tacy Callies What began as an experiment in Ben Krupski’s 10-acre grove in Howey-in-the-Hills, Florida, is now a common practice he uses as production manager for Lennon Grove Service. Four years ago, Krupski started testing the use of compost in his small leased block of Hamlin trees. In the first …