Sting Nematodes and IPCs

Jim Rogers IPCs, Pests, Tip of the Week

By Larry Duncan and Fernando Alferez Newly planted citrus trees are far less tolerant of pests and diseases than when mature. Sting nematode (Belonolaimus longicaudatus) was not considered a serious economic threat to Florida citrus until successive hard freezes in the 1980s caused widespread replanting of groves. Patches of stunted, declining trees caused by the irregular distribution of sting nematodes …

Planning Your 2023 Pest Management

Jim Rogers Pest Management, Tip of the Week

By Lauren Diepenbrock Pest management is a year-round challenge in Florida citrus. With the warm climate, pests are at the ready as soon as plant resources are available to them. With knowledge of insect and mite biology in relation to tree phenology, plans can be developed to protect fruit and maintain productive citrus trees. Populations of some highly problematic pests …

Postharvest Water Requirements for Packers

Jim Rogers Packing, Regulation, Tip of the Week

By Clara Diekman, Micah Gallagher, Taylor O’Bannon and Michelle Danyluk Compliance dates for all water associated with the Produce Safety Rule (PSR, Subpart E) has previously been delayed, pending completion of the rule. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced in the fall of 2022 that postharvest water requirements in the PSR will be enforced on large farms beginning …

Get the Timing Right for Gibberellic Acid Applications

Jim Rogers HLB Management, Tip of the Week

By Tripti Vashisth Since 2021, a number of Florida growers have adopted the use of gibberellic acid (GA) in their grove management programs. This widespread adoption is due to the fact that GA-treated trees show canopy rejuvenation and reduction in preharvest fruit drop, resulting in improved yields. The research on Valencia shows that the effect of GA improves over time. …

Oak Mulch Can Improve Florida Flatwoods Soil

Tacy Callies Soil Improvement, Tip of the Week

By Lorenzo Rossi With no cure for HLB available, searching for alternative mitigation strategies is an urgent priority for a sustainable citrus industry. Interest has grown regarding the use of organic amendments to improve the fertility of Florida native soils. Although hardwood mulch applications have been demonstrated to improve both tree health and soil fertility in other fruit industries, little …

mandarin

Techniques Tested on Mandarins in CUPS

Jim Rogers CUPS, Mandarins, Tip of the Week

By Rhuanito S. Ferrarezi and Mark A. Ritenour Two independent trials were conducted under a commercial citrus under protective screen (CUPS) system. The first trial was to investigate canopy management strategies to improve fruit yield and quality of mandarins. Canopy management is essential for CUPS since the environment stimulates vigorous vegetative growth, posing operational challenges to mechanization that can be …

It’s Time to Target Adult Asian Citrus Psyllids

Jim Rogers Pests, Psyllids, Tip of the Week

By Lauren Diepenbrock Pest management is an ongoing effort in Florida citrus. Taking advantage of pest life cycles has been shown to be an effective tool for reducing populations of target pests. For many citrus growers, managing impacts of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), the vector of huanglongbing (HLB), is part of the annual management plan. As we enter the …

Improving Yield Safety of Glyphosate

Jim Rogers Tip of the Week, weeds

By Ramdas Kanissery Florida citrus growers face weed management problems throughout the year because of conditions that favor rapid weed growth in groves. A weed-free tree row is desired in a citrus grove to minimize weed competition with trees. Hence, chemical weed control using post-emergent, systemic herbicides like glyphosate has become a vital production practice in the Florida citrus industry. …

The Essential Elements of Reset Management

Jim Rogers planting, Tip of the Week

By Mongi Zekri For maximum efficiency of a grove, it is essential that every location is occupied by a tree and that every tree is healthy. Prompt replacement of dead and declining trees means higher average long-term returns from the grove. If the declining trees remain in the grove, they keep getting weaker and yield less fruit each year. Therefore, …

Flower Bud Advisories Promote Better Planning

Jim Rogers Production, Tip of the Week

By Tripti Vashisth In Florida, it is the time of year to start following citrus flower bud induction conditions for next year’s bloom. Citrus flower bud induction starts in the fall and usually is complete by early January. Low temperatures first stop growth and then promote induction of flower buds as more hours of low temperatures accumulate (below 68 degrees). …

Managing Pest and Predatory Mites in CUPS

Jim Rogers CUPS, Pests, Tip of the Week

By Emilie Demard Mites are pests of economic importance in traditional groves and citrus under protective screen (CUPS). Results from a two-year survey in CUPS at the Indian River Research and Education Center (IRREC) in Fort Pierce, Florida, showed that the citrus rust mite and the citrus red mite populations can reach high levels resulting in leaf and fruit damage. …

Post-Hurricane Weed Management

Jim Rogers Tip of the Week, weeds

By Ramdas Kanissery Hurricanes and the associated flooding will impact weed management in the affected season and the following years. Weeds should be effectively managed after these severe weather events as weeds may take advantage of the reduced competitiveness of recovering trees. INTENSIFY SCOUTINGA critical step in weed management after hurricanes is to scout groves and note the emergence of …

Growers Needed for UF/IFAS Tree Recovery Assessment

Jim Rogers hurricane, Tip of the Week

By Christopher Vincent Growers affected by flooding and high winds from Hurricane Ian have seen the immediate effects, but the stress to the trees will have longer lasting effects as well.  It is not known how big these effects will be or how long trees take to recover. University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) researchers want …

Phytophthora Treatments for Hurricane-Damaged Groves

Jim Rogers Diseases, hurricane, Tip of the Week

By Megan Dewdney A priority for the Florida citrus industry is evaluating groves for damage and determining the best course of action going forward after the destruction of Hurricane Ian. One of the many considerations is the effect of flooding on root health, particularly if standing water has remained longer than 72 hours. The main diseases are phytophthora foot, crown …

Two Ways to Treat Ian-Stressed Trees

Jim Rogers hurricane, Irrigation, Tip of the Week

Give trees a bit of relief with frequent irrigation and kaolin particle film. By Christopher Vincent Hurricane Ian caused damage to orange trees, knocking fruit on the ground, twisting and breaking limbs, stripping leaves off trees and flooding soil. Although lots of damage was visible immediately, the after-effects will continue to rear their ugly heads in the months to come, …

Rejuvenating Hurricane-Impacted Citrus Groves

Jim Rogers hurricane, Tip of the Week

By Tripti Vashisth Hurricane Ian caused extensive destruction on the Florida coast and inland, in both urban and rural areas. The state’s citrus groves had to sustain hurricane-speed winds and flooding. HLB-affected trees undergo a lot a stress, and now the hurricane has added more abiotic stress to trees. High-speed winds caused significant fruit drop and leaf drop. The goal …

Flooded Fields and Food Safety

Jim Rogers Food Safety, hurricane, Tip of the Week

By Michelle Danyluk In terms of food safety, not all standing water in a field is considered floodwater. Flooding is considered the flowing or overflowing of a field from open bodies of water outside the food crop producer’s control. Events that lead to pooled water or excess standing water in a field, such as rain or a problem with an …

Fruit Displays Offer Growers Opportunities to Give Feedback

Jim Rogers Events, Tip of the Week, Varieties

By Peter Chaires Each season, variety displays and field days offer growers, packers, processors, nurseries, marketers, flavor companies and other interested parties an opportunity to experience the latest developments in Florida’s citrus breeding programs. Each team takes its own approach to these events. Some are more focused on fruit displays and sampling, some have field tours, and others include scientific …

FAWN Expansion Underway

Jim Rogers Tip of the Week, Weather

By Rick Lusher The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) is a great resource for citrus growers. Its mission is to leverage timely, reliable and accurate weather data in support of effective agricultural decision-making and stewardship of natural, human and fiscal resources. In addition to weather information accessible in multiple databases, there …