Fruit Displays Offer Growers Opportunities to Give Feedback

Jim Rogers Events, Tip of the Week, Varieties

By Peter Chaires Each season, variety displays and field days offer growers, packers, processors, nurseries, marketers, flavor companies and other interested parties an opportunity to experience the latest developments in Florida’s citrus breeding programs. Each team takes its own approach to these events. Some are more focused on fruit displays and sampling, some have field tours, and others include scientific …

FAWN Expansion Underway

Jim Rogers Tip of the Week, Weather

By Rick Lusher The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) is a great resource for citrus growers. Its mission is to leverage timely, reliable and accurate weather data in support of effective agricultural decision-making and stewardship of natural, human and fiscal resources. In addition to weather information accessible in multiple databases, there …

Stay Current With Research on Rootstocks

Jim Rogers Rootstocks, Tip of the Week

By Jude Grosser The ultimate solution to the HLB problem is having good rootstocks that can mitigate or eliminate the disease’s impacts in any grafted commercial scion. With this, growers could profitably grow any scion, including grapefruit, Hamlin or even Murcott. Thus, rootstock breeding efforts focus on directly screening new rootstock hybrids for their ability to confer HLB tolerance or …

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Grower Response Needed After a Disaster

Jim Rogers Tip of the Week

By Christa Court Disaster events, such as extreme weather events (hurricanes, floods, droughts, etc.), have always been and will continue to be a threat for growers. Impacts to a citrus grove might include production losses associated with fruit drop from surviving trees and asset damages to buildings, machinery/equipment, irrigation systems and destroyed trees. Producers might also incur increased costs for …

How to Get Certified for Paraquat Dichloride Use

Jim Rogers Pesticides, Regulation, Tip of the Week

By Ajia Paolillo and Lourdes Pérez Cordero If you use herbicides containing paraquat dichloride in your citrus groves, it is important that you are aware of the use certification requirements for this product. In 2016, certification and training for the use of this pesticide were put into place in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) risk mitigation requirements. Any …

Groundcovers Influence Citrus Yield and Water Use

Jim Rogers Irrigation, Production, Tip of the Week

By Sandra M. Guzmán In Florida citrus, black fabric mulch groundcovers have been used for the control of the invasive Diaprepes abbreviatus (root weevil). However, these groundcovers can also serve as a best management practice (BMP) to optimize tree water uptake and maintain nutrients around the root system. A three-year University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) …

New Finger Lime Cultivars for the Specialty Citrus Market

Jim Rogers Limes, Tip of the Week, Varieties

By Manjul Dutt The finger lime is an HLB-tolerant Australian native citrus that has been gaining popularity and importance in the last few years. Finger lime has several unique fruit qualities that set it apart from conventional sweet oranges and mandarins. The primary characteristic of this fruit is the round to teardrop-shaped juice vesicles, known as “citrus caviar,” that burst …

How to Manage Salt Stress in Citrus Groves

Jim Rogers soil, Tip of the Week, Water

By Amir Rezazadeh Saline soil and water damage many citrus groves in Florida. In general, when the dissolved salt concentration in soil or water increases, it is referred to as “saline” soil or water. But how much increase in salt concentration makes soil or water saline? Citrus plants’ major reactions to excessive salt in the soil or water are reduced …

Get the Newest UF/IFAS Info at the Citrus & Specialty Crop Expo

Jim Rogers Citrus Expo, Education, Tip of the Week

By Jamie Burrow and Ruth Borger Over the last several months, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) citrus team has been preparing for the annual Citrus & Specialty Crop Expo. The excitement is in the air as many faculty are preparing seminar presentations on valuable information that growers may use today to support their operations. …

It’s Almost Time to Spray Gibberellic Acid

Jim Rogers HLB Management, Tip of the Week

By Tripti Vashisth Gibberellic acid (GA) can benefit citrus trees in many ways. GA can improve vegetative and fruit growth while reducing fruit drop and flowering intensity. Evidence is mounting that repeated application of GA is needed to induce the desired positive effect on fruit growth and tree productivity. In a multiyear field trial on Valencia orange, monthly application of …

Managing Macronutrients and Micronutrients

Jim Rogers Nutrition, Tip of the Week

By Davie Kadyampakeni Nutrients are needed for optimal citrus tree growth, fruit yields and juice quality. Any nutrient deficiencies could result in low yields and decreased revenue. Make sure citrus trees receive adequate macronutrients and micronutrients at all times. Macronutrients are those nutrients needed in large quantities to influence yield, growth and fruit quality. Macronutrients are further divided into two …

Wildflowers May Benefit Citrus Groves

Jim Rogers Pests, Research, Tip of the Week

By Xavier Martini Planting wildflowers in and around fields is known to provide food resources and habitats for beneficial arthropods like pollinators and predators of pests. In two locations (Lake Alfred and Monticello), University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) researchers tested whether planting native Florida wildflowers next to citrus grove windbreaks could improve natural pest control …

Protecting Citrus Trees From Heat Stress

Jim Rogers Tip of the Week, Weather

By Anirban Guha Heat stress could take a toll on citrus tree health and fruit yield. In Florida, the hot season lasts more than four months. Long, hot, oppressive summer days can heat up leaves and fruit and make the trees extra thirsty. Also, high soil evaporation, irregular rainfall and poor soil water-holding capacity can often lead to summer drought …

Reduce HLB Pressure and Enhance Growth With Kaolin

Jim Rogers HLB Management, Tip of the Week

By Christopher Vincent Kaolin particle film is a non-toxic tool to reduce psyllids and increase tree growth. Particle films are nothing more than a suspension of solid particles that make a “film” on the leaves after they dry. They work mostly by reflecting light. Kaolin is the most common type of particle film because the clay is mined directly and …

Selecting the Right Leaves for Sampling

Jim Rogers Nutrition, Tip of the Week

By Jamie D. Burrow and Tripti Vashisth With the increased cost and limited availability of fertilizer, purchasing decisions are more important now than ever. Collecting the right leaves for sampling is the first step to making fertilizer decisions. Leaf samples should consist of 100 leaves that are 4- to 6-month-old spring flush leaves taken from nonfruiting branches. WHY LEAVES FROM …

Releasing Rootstocks: Balancing Responsibility With Urgency

Jim Rogers Rootstocks, Tip of the Week

By Bill Castle, Fred Gmitter and Jude Grosser The rootstock development cycle, from creation to eight years in the field to release, is presently about 10 to 15 years. However, if multiple trials are involved, then the time required is increased. The criteria used to advance new selections through the system are commercially based. Rootstocks for juice fruit are assessed …

Changes in Pesticide Residue Tolerances on Citrus Destined for Korea

Jim Rogers Export, Pesticides, Tip of the Week

By Mark A. Ritenour The U.S. and other countries set maximum residue limits (MRLs) on fresh produce for various chemicals, including pesticides that might be used preharvest or postharvest. These materials must be labeled for use on the crop of interest and used only according to label instructions. While it is unlikely for U.S. MRLs to be exceeded when label …

Use Physical Barriers for Root Health

Jim Rogers IPCs, Root health, Tip of the Week

By Larry Duncan Citrus trees in Florida soils infested with diaprepes root weevil (Diaprepes abbreviatus) or sting nematode (Belonolaimus longicaudatus) frequently contend with devastating damage to their root systems. This is made even worse by root loss due to huanglongbing (HLB) disease. Where soil conditions are conducive to the insect or nematode, it is very difficult to prevent major economic …

Keep CTV Under Control

Jim Rogers Diseases, Tip of the Week

By Amit Levy Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) infects the citrus phloem. CTV infects almost all citrus varieties, but it causes different disease symptoms depending on the virus isolate, the citrus variety and scion-rootstock combination. Florida has three dominant strains of CTV: T36, a decline-causing strain T30, which normally does not cause severe disease VT, a stem-pitting causing strain CTV is …