Oak Mulch Can Improve Florida Flatwoods Soil

Tacy CalliesSoil Improvement, Tip of the Week

By Lorenzo Rossi With no cure for HLB available, searching for alternative mitigation strategies is an urgent priority for a sustainable citrus industry. Interest has grown regarding the use of organic amendments to improve the fertility of Florida native soils. Although hardwood mulch applications have been demonstrated to improve both tree health and soil fertility in other fruit industries, little …

An Update on Oak Mulch to Increase Soil Health

Josh McGillResearch, Soil Improvement

By Lukas M. Hallman, John M. Santiago and Lorenzo Rossi At first glance, one may not see how oak trees relate to citrus production. But in the early 2010s, growers and scientists reported seeing little to no HLB symptoms on citrus growing underneath the dripline of oak trees compared to citrus trees nearby but not directly under oak trees. These …

Update on Oak Mulch Research to Fight HLB

Ashley RobinsonHLB Management, Research

Researchers have been looking for ways to help Florida citrus growers fight HLB, and spreading oak mulch around the drip line of citrus trees appears promising. Lukas Hallman, a graduate student at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Indian River Research and Education Center (IRREC) is doing research to find what is in oak trees …

Grower Sees Success With Oak Mulch

Ernie NeffProduction

Like several commercial Florida citrus growers, Ben Bateman of Brandon has noticed strong improvement in what he calls his “recreational grove” after applying oak mulch to the trees. Bateman planted 26 mixed-variety trees in large pots about six years ago, transplanting them to the ground five years ago. He said he spent nearly $1,000 on foliar nutrients “with little to …

Growing Citrus Trees With Oak Mulch

Ernie NeffHLB Management

Lukas Hallman, a graduate student at the Indian River Research and Education Center (IRREC), is doing research to find what is in oak trees that apparently helps citrus cope with HLB. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences operates the IRREC. “Anecdotal reports from Florida growers claim that citrus trees growing within the drip line of large …

Oak Leaf Extract and Mulch for HLB

Ernie NeffCitrus Expo

Researchers on the Indian River have proved “there is something in the oak leaf that can work” against HLB, said Lorenzo Rossi. “I’m not saying that I found the cure, and I’m not saying that oak extract will save the citrus industry.” He described oak extract, and possibly oak mulch, as another tool against HLB. Rossi, a University of Florida …

Oak Leaf Extract Tested as HLB Tool

Ernie NeffHLB Management

In the search for solutions to HLB, a formulation based on oak leaf extract has been developed by citrus growers Travis Murphy and Tom Thayer, the Indian River Citrus League’s October River Ramblings newsletter reported. The formulation was developed following the growers’ observations that citrus trees under oak trees were free of HLB compared to nearby field trees that had …

Get the Newest UF/IFAS Info at the Citrus & Specialty Crop Expo

Josh McGillCitrus Expo, Education, Tip of the Week

By Jamie Burrow and Ruth Borger Over the last several months, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) citrus team has been preparing for the annual Citrus & Specialty Crop Expo. The excitement is in the air as many faculty are preparing seminar presentations on valuable information that growers may use today to support their operations. …

Sneak Peek: June 2022 Citrus Industry

Josh McGillNutrition, Sneak Peek, soil

In the quest to keep HLB-infected citrus trees productive, many growers are turning to techniques to improve soil health. That’s the focus of the June issue of Citrus Industry magazine. The hope is that better soil health will lead to better tree health. Methods under study include compost, cover crops and oak mulch. Citrus grower and consultant Brad Turner makes …

Florida Grower Citrus Show Agenda Set

Ernie NeffAll In For Citrus Podcast, Events

Researchers Mark Ritenour and Sandra Guzmán with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) outline the agenda for the Florida Grower Citrus Show on Jan. 26-27 in Fort Pierce. Ritenour and Guzmán, both of the UF/IFAS Indian River Research and Education Center, will be presenters at the show. Ritenour will discuss maximum residue tolerances for fruit …

HLB and Citrus Root Health

Ernie NeffHLB Management, Root health

“We’re not going to have a silver bullet” for HLB, says Lorenzo Rossi, an assistant professor at the Indian River Research and Education Center. Instead, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) root biologist says that researchers are trying to keep citrus producing profitably. Rossi described some of his research efforts that focus on root health …

citrus

All In For Citrus Podcast, March 2020

Taylor HillmanAll In For Citrus Podcast

The March episode of the All In For Citrus podcast covers how the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Citrus Research and Education Center (CREC) is operating under COVID-19 restrictions and some of the research that continues. CREC Center Director Michael Rogers starts the episode with the impacts COVID-19 is having on the citrus research team …

IRREC Student and Researcher Honored

Ernie NeffAwards

A University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) doctoral student and the researcher who oversees his work have received awards from the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS). Student Lukas Hallman won the first Graduate Student Scholars Award. Researcher Lorenzo Rossi received the Professional Early Career Award. Both are at the UF/IFAS Indian River Research and Education …

Row-Middle Weed Management Methods

Tacy Calliesweeds

By Ramdas Kanissery, Miurel Brewer, Davie Kadyampakeni and Sarah Strauss Florida growers face problems with weeds throughout the year due to favorable weather conditions that allow rapid proliferation and lush growth of weeds in groves. While a weed-free tree row is desired to minimize competition with citrus, it is also essential to manage the weeds or vegetation in the row …