Pests, Pathogens and IPCs

Jim Rogers IPCs, Pests, Research

By Lauren Diepenbrock, Megan Dewdney, Fernando Alferez, Jawwad Qureshi and Ozgur Batuman Individual protective covers (IPCs) are becoming commonplace in citrus production to support the development of young trees after planting. IPCs are made of fine mesh and are intended to keep Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) off young plants. Because ACP can transmit the pathogen that causes citrus greening/huanglongbing, preventing …

IPCs Improve Fruit Yield and Quality

Jim Rogers HLB Management, IPCs, Research

By Fernando Alferez, Ute Albrecht, Susmita Gaire, Ozgur Batuman, Jawwad Qureshi and Mongi Zekri University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) researchers established a field trial in February 2018 to evaluate the efficacy of individual protective covers (IPCs) to prevent Asian citrus psyllids from spreading HLB and to study the effects on tree growth and physiology. The …

Pests and Diseases in Trees With IPCs

Jim Rogers HLB Management, Research

All indications are that the recent widespread use of individual protective covers (IPCs) on young citrus trees in Florida is beneficial, especially for excluding Asian citrus psyllids and the HLB they spread. If there is any downside, it may be that some other pests and diseases are more prevalent under IPCs. In a recent American Society for Horticultural Science webinar, …

Trial Confirms Benefits of IPCs

Jim Rogers Florida, HLB Management, Pests

Individual protective covers (IPCs) on citrus trees have become a more common sight in Florida groves in recent years. The bags that cover young trees exclude the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) from feeding on the plants, thus protecting them from HLB. Some estimates suggest that more than 1 million IPCs are now deployed in the state’s citrus groves. During the …

IPCs Help With Diaprepes and Nematodes

Ernie Neff Pests

Florida citrus growers have known for several years that individual protective covers (IPCs) do a good job of excluding HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllids from young trees. “But those protective covers also protect from things like Diaprepes abbreviatus,” researcher Larry Duncan told the recent Citrus Expo audience. Duncan is a nematologist at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural …

IPCs and Tree Performance

Ashley Robinson HLB Management

Preventing HLB infection in newly planted citrus trees with individual protective covers (IPCs) can improve productivity and fruit quality. Thus far, IPCs have kept young citrus trees free of HLB in research plots. “Once you plant a tree, if it’s not protected, it’s exposed to HLB infection from day one,” says Fernando Alferez, an assistant professor at the University of …

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Scout IPCs for Pests

Tacy Callies Pests, Tip of the Week

By Jawwad Qureshi Young citrus trees produce shoots with feather-stage leaves more frequently, making them highly attractive to the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). This pest requires young shoots with feather-stage leaves to develop and reproduce. ACP is the pathogen’s primary vector responsible for causing huanglongbing (HLB) disease. Plant infection with HLB at an early age makes it challenging to bring …

Protecting Trees: Beyond CUPS and IPCs

Ernie Neff HLB Management

Many Florida citrus growers have been using individual protective covers (IPCs) for several years primarily to protect trees from HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllids (ACP). Smaller but increasing numbers of growers are utilizing the more expensive citrus under protective screen (CUPS) system to protect trees from ACP and HLB. Recently, Fernando Alferez informed growers in a virtual presentation about some other …

IPCs Prevent HLB Infection

Ernie Neff Citrus Expo, HLB Management

The use of individual protective covers (IPCs) for young trees prevented Asian citrus psyllid transmission and HLB infection in a trial near Immokalee, Fernando Alferez reported during the recent virtual Citrus Expo. Alferez said citrus trees planted at the Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC) in January 2018 and covered with IPCs have been HLB-free for 32 months. Alferez …

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Pests in CUPS and IPCs

Ernie Neff CUPS, Pests

Citrus under protective screen (CUPS) and young trees covered with individual protective covers (IPCs) have generally been well protected from HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllids, but not from all other pests. Entomologist Jawwad Qureshi says the psyllids only get to trees when a CUPS structure or IPC is damaged, as happened to CUPS during Hurricane Irma in 2017. “Otherwise they do …

IPCs for HLB Prevention in Young Trees

Tacy Callies HLB Management

By Fernando Alferez, Susmita Gaire, Ute Albrecht, Ozgur Batuman, Jawwad Qureshi and Mongi Zekri Controlling the Asian citrus psyllid vector of huanglongbing (HLB) is critical, especially in young trees. Reducing HLB incidence is essential for tree survival and productivity under current endemic conditions. Individual protective covers (IPCs) are a novel strategy based on psyllid exclusion by means of a protective …

Economics of CUPS and IPCs

Ernie Neff CUPS, Economics, HLB Management

At Citrus Expo, economist Ariel Singerman discussed the economics of producing citrus under protective screen (CUPS) and covering young trees with individual protective covers (IPCs). The primary purpose of both strategies is to exclude HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllids. Singerman is with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS). Singerman calculated that a CUPS grower who insures …

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IPCs Effective Against Psyllids and HLB

Ernie Neff HLB Management, Pests, Psyllids

Long-time multi-county citrus Extension agent Mongi Zekri, who serves Southwest Florida counties, says individual protective covers (IPCs) work well in the fight against citrus greening, also known as HLB. “They have been very effective in controlling or managing citrus greening, because they don’t allow the citrus psyllid, which is the vector of the disease, to get to the tree,” Zekri …

Use Physical Barriers for Root Health

Jim Rogers IPCs, Root health, Tip of the Week

By Larry Duncan Citrus trees in Florida soils infested with diaprepes root weevil (Diaprepes abbreviatus) or sting nematode (Belonolaimus longicaudatus) frequently contend with devastating damage to their root systems. This is made even worse by root loss due to huanglongbing (HLB) disease. Where soil conditions are conducive to the insect or nematode, it is very difficult to prevent major economic …

Sneak Peek: May 2022 Citrus Industry

Jim Rogers HLB Management, Pesticides, Sneak Peek

While many citrus growers use similar strategies to cope with HLB, no two approaches are exactly the same. One grower who uses a very different method to manage citrus greening is Chip Henry. In the May cover story of Citrus Industry magazine, he tells how growing organically has helped him successfully fight the disease. Sometimes, production practices aimed at protecting …

Extension Agents Still Seeing Damage From Freeze

Jim Rogers Florida, freeze, Weather

It often takes time for the damage associated with freeze events to manifest in citrus. That was the case for the late January freeze in Florida. While some growers escaped fairly unscathed, others suffered significant damage. The damage began to show in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s March citrus crop forecast. The agency lowered expected production of Florida oranges this …

Comparison of ACP/HLB Management Tools for Citrus Resets

Jim Rogers Diseases, HLB Management, Research

By Lauren Diepenbrock, Megan Dewdney, Christopher Vincent and Davie Kadyampakeni As the threat of potential shutdowns loomed in March 2020, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) team put the final plants in the ground, individual protective covers (IPCs) on trees, and kaolin and pesticide applications on a 2.7-acre planting at the Citrus Research and Education …

Sneak Peek: March 2022 Citrus Industry

Jim Rogers Sneak Peek

The March issue of Citrus Industry magazine includes an abundance of advice on getting trees off to a good start. According to citrus grower Brad Turner, healthy soil is key to setting up trees for success. In his article, he gives growers pointers on soil preparation prior to planting. Other topics he addresses include mulch considerations, nutritional needs, pest management …

Three Florida Citrus Pests of Concern

Ernie Neff Pests

Lebbeck mealybug, the Bulimulus sporadicus snail and Brevipalpus mite are Florida citrus pests that were discussed at Citrus Expo in August. University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) entomologist Lukasz Stelinski delivered information about the three pests for fellow UF/IFAS entomologist Lauren Diepenbrock. LEBBECK MEALYBUGLebbeck mealybug damages fruit, leaves and stems. The pest causes fruit drop and …

Covers Prevent Psyllids and HLB

Ernie Neff IPCs

About four years ago, Fernando Alferez started to test whether citrus trees grown inside protective mesh covers could be kept safe from the HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllid. New research from Alferez shows that citrus trees grown under individual protective covers (IPCs) show no signs of HLB, also known as citrus greening. Specifically, scientists found that psyllids cannot penetrate the IPCs …