Asian Citrus Psyllid Anatomical Discoveries

Ernie NeffPsyllids

Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR) have made the first anatomical atlas of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), which spreads HLB. The research group, led by Professor Susan J. Brown from Kansas State University, conducted a multidisciplinary project to study the psyllid, the bacteria it transmits, its effects and means of control. The U.S. research team approached Javier Alba-Tercedor … Read More

Economically Sustainable Psyllid Control

Ernie NeffPsyllids

Spraying for the HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is essential for HLB control even when virtually all trees are already infected with the disease. Entomologist Lukasz Stelinski made that declaration early in his virtual presentation at the April 6 Florida Citrus Growers’ Institute. Stelinski is an entomologist at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Citrus … Read More

Scouting Tips for Finding Asian Citrus Psyllids

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

A presentation at the recent Citrus Pest & Disease Prevention Committee State of the Central Valley meeting in California highlighted the importance of scouting for Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) in groves. Scouting becomes even more critical as the risk of ACP and HLB, the disease the insect transmits to trees, rises. The presenter, University of California (UC) Riverside Extension Specialist … Read More

The Do’s and Don’ts of Spraying for Psyllids

Ashley RobinsonPsyllids

acp

Psyllid sprays have been a point of contention for Florida citrus growers. Under endemic HLB conditions, high psyllid control costs have cut into the grower’s bottom line, which has already been hit by reduced production. So, what is the right time to spray and how can a grower remain sustainable and profitable? Lukasz Stelinski, University of Florida professor of entomology … Read More

Citrus Phenology-Based Spraying for Psyllids

Ashley RobinsonPsyllids

invasive

By targeting Asian citrus psyllids on an area-wide scale and focusing on several individual properties simultaneously, growers can minimize psyllid movement between groves, reduce HLB transmission and maintain citrus production at a profitable level. Generally, most psyllid sprays are applied on a calendar or threshold basis, resulting in high-spray frequencies and associated costs. Because of the Asian citrus psyllid’s high … Read More

Tarping Proven to Reduce ACP Movement

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

Researchers at the California Data Analysis and Tactical Operations Center (DATOC) have analyzed Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) trapping data along major transportation routes before and after tarping regulations for bulk citrus shipments were enacted. The purpose was to determine the effectiveness of the policy. DATOC is an independent group of scientists sponsored by the Citrus Research Board and the California … Read More

Dormant Sprays for Asian Citrus Psyllid Management

Tacy CalliesPsyllids

By Jawwad Qureshi Several studies have documented the positive effects of controlling the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Figure 1) for citrus tree health and sustainability in Florida. The mature blocks established before and after the discovery of huanglongbing (HLB) in 2005 continue to benefit from psyllid control. One psyllid is enough to infect a tree with HLB for life, and … Read More

HLB-Positive ACP Found in San Diego County

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Industry News Release, Psyllids

A citrus tree at a private residence near San Diego, California, has been found to be infected by four Asian citrus psyllids (ACP). Upon testing, the ACP were found to be carriers of the bacterium that causes citrus greening, also known as huanglongbing (HLB). The finding was announced by the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s Citrus Pest and Disease … Read More

Controlling Psyllids: A Threshold Approach

Ernie NeffPsyllids

Citrus growers should consider controlling HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) only when a prescribed ACP population, or threshold, is reached. Entomologist Lukasz Stelinski suggested this approach in a virtual Citrus Expo presentation. Stelinski is a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher at the Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred. A summary slide Stelinski showed … Read More

Sudden ACP Increase in California Worrisome

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

To the surprise and consternation of growers and officials, 74 Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) have been discovered in Kern County, California, since June. Local and state officials are concerned about the recent uptick in trappings and are working to find how extensively the infestation has spread. The trappings have been equally dispersed in residential and commercial citrus. Staff from the … Read More

Task Force Sounds Alarm on ACP Finds

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

California’s ACP/HLB San Joaquin Valley Task Force reports that an increased number of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) trap finds have occurred in the southern part of Kern County. The task force made the announcement in an open message to all citrus growers in the San Joaquin Valley. It was published on the Citrus Insider website on Oct. 16. Last month … Read More

Psyllid Study to Determine Degree of HLB Risk

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

psyllids

University of California Riverside Extension Specialist Monique Rivera said that funding for a new research project to study the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) has been approved. The project will take a closer look at the phenology of huanglongbing (the citrus disease ACP spreads) and its prevalence in psyllid populations. The scientists will be looking for patterns that will help them … Read More

Infected ACP Found in California Commercial Grove Is No Surprise

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

For the first time, an Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) carrying the bacteria which causes huanglongbing (HLB) was found in a commercial grove in Riverside County. While the discovery has prompted concern, University of California Riverside Extension Specialist Monique Rivera said that the find has been expected and is not all that surprising. “We’ve had positive trees removed here in Riverside, … Read More

IPM Approaches to Reduce Psyllid Populations

Tacy CalliesCitrus, Psyllids

invasive

Lukasz Stelinski recently shared integrated pest management strategies for reducing Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) populations to optimize tree health and yield. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences professor of entomology and nematology presented the information during the 2020 virtual Florida Citrus Industry Annual Conference. Even with approximately 100 percent of Florida citrus trees infected with huanglongbing … Read More

First CLas-Positive ACP Found in California Grove

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Industry News Release, Psyllids

An Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) sample has been confirmed positive for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the bacteria that causes huanglongbing (HLB). The sample was collected from a commercial citrus grove in the Woodcrest area of Riverside County. Confirmed by Citrus Research Board’s Jerry Dimitman Laboratory, this single adult psyllid is the first CLas-positive ACP found in a commercial citrus grove … Read More

New Book on the Asian Citrus Psyllid and HLB

Ernie NeffHLB Management, Psyllids

A book about the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) and huanglongbing (HLB), edited by Jawwad Qureshi and the late Phil Stansly, was recently published by the Center for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI). Qureshi is an entomologist with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS); Stansly was also a UF/IFAS entomologist. The book is Asian Citrus Psyllid: … Read More

Psyllids May Give a Year’s Warning of HLB

Ernie NeffPsyllids

psyllids

Although huanglongbing (HLB) disease was detected in Florida citrus in 2005, the HLB bacterium wasn’t found in Texas until 2011, when scientists detected it in Asian citrus psyllids (ACP). The disease wasn’t found in Texas citrus trees until 2012, suggesting that the HLB-spreading psyllids may be used for early detection of the pathogen in newly invaded areas. Factors influencing the spread … Read More

Battling the Bacteria Inside Psyllids

Tacy CalliesPsyllids

acp

Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski, University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) associate professor, recently discussed her research on bacteria associated with Asian citrus psyllids. This includes endosymbiotic bacteria that live inside of psyllids as well as the liberibacter that causes citrus greening disease. Her research is looking at how these microorganisms can be targeted inside the psyllid to reduce … Read More

Cost-Effective Psyllid Control Strategies

Ernie NeffPsyllids

Lukasz Stelinski makes the case that reducing HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) populations improves tree health — even when trees already have HLB. The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) entomologist offers several tips about psyllid control in a new presentation available online. Keeping ACP populations down seems to help yield, Stelinski states. His hypothesis is … Read More

Weed Control May Help Psyllid Management

Tacy CalliesCitrus, Psyllids, weeds

By Ramdas Kanissery, Justin George and Lukasz Stelinski Weed management is a crucial component in Florida’s citrus production. Recent University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) research shows that weed management may have additional pest management benefits for citrus growers. Maintaining a weed-free grove and perimeter areas may help improve management of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), … Read More