Infected ACP Found in California Commercial Grove Is No Surprise

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

For the first time, an Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) carrying the bacteria which causes huanglongbing (HLB) was found in a commercial grove in Riverside County. While the discovery has prompted concern, University of California Riverside Extension Specialist Monique Rivera said that the find has been expected and is not all that surprising. “We’ve had positive trees removed here in Riverside, …

First CLas-Positive ACP Found in California Grove

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Industry News Release, Psyllids

An Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) sample has been confirmed positive for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the bacteria that causes huanglongbing (HLB). The sample was collected from a commercial citrus grove in the Woodcrest area of Riverside County. Confirmed by Citrus Research Board’s Jerry Dimitman Laboratory, this single adult psyllid is the first CLas-positive ACP found in a commercial citrus grove …

chemicals

UF Researcher Seeks Biological Control of ACP

Tacy CalliesPests, Regulation

In the latest All In For Citrus podcast, Ozgur Batuman talks about his research into biological control of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). Batuman is an assistant professor at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Southwest Florida Research and Education Center. ACP control is necessary for management of citrus greening disease, or huanglongbing (HLB). Batuman’s …

acp

ACP Found in Sacramento

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Citrus Greening, HLB Management

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), working in cooperation with the Sacramento County agricultural commissioner, has placed Sacramento County under a plant pest quarantine for the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) following the detection of one ACP in Sacramento’s Lemon Hill area.  The quarantine prohibits the movement of citrus and curry leaf tree nursery stock and all plant parts, …

acp

Researching Scouting Strategies for ACP

Daniel CooperCitrus, Psyllids

Several research projects continue at University of California Riverside to evaluate strategies for better detection of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). Monique Rivera, assistant cooperative Extension specialist, is looking into something referred to as the ‘edge effect’ and how it pertains to ACP control. “The ‘edge effect’ is basically an ecological term that we’re using in the context of Asian citrus …

Kaolin Clay May Be Viable Option to Protect Citrus Trees from ACP

Daniel CooperCitrus Greening, Industry News Release, Psyllids, Research

Florida citrus growers have begun taking notice of kaolin clay, a powdery white compound, because it can cause Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) to “not take notice” of their groves. Long used to protect other fruit and vegetable crops, kaolin can also conceal citrus trees from hungry psyllids by confusing their visual sensory system, said Michael Rogers, director of the Citrus …

fungus

Visalia ACP Find Was a Breeding Population

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner

The Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) found last week in a residential area in north Visalia, California, were a breeding population, according to Greg Douhan, University of California Cooperative Extension farm advisor for citrus. The ACP were found in four locations in the city, not in close proximity to any agricultural operations. “Most of the findings found in the San Joaquin Valley …

psyllids

Numerous ACP Found Near Visalia, California

Len WilcoxCalifornia Corner, Citrus

A large population of Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) and nymphs were found in an older residential area northwest of Visalia, California, last week. With multiple life stages of ACP found, county and state officials have moved into eradication mode immediately. According to the Visalia Times-Delta, 250 ACP were found in four locations. California Citrus Mutual reported that up to 400 …

psyllids

ACP Pheromone to Improve Trapping

Tacy CalliesResearch

By Len Wilcox University of California Davis (UC Davis) researchers have identified the sex pheromone of the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), a discovery which will lead to better methods of controlling the pest. The ACP is a major threat to citrus around the world. The psyllid is a tiny insect with the potential to wreak havoc as it spreads the …

Controlling ACP and Other Pests as Critical as Ever

Tacy CalliesCitrus Greening

By Jawwad A. Qureshi and Philip A. Stansly More than a decade has passed since 2006, when huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening disease was identified in Florida. By then, the disease had already spread widely and went unrecognized due to high psyllid populations and a disease incubation period of months or years between infection and symptom expression. Nevertheless, management of …

florida citrus

ACP Movement Shows History Repeating Itself

Kelsey FryCitrus, Legislative

Research is looking at what we can learn from the Asian citrus psyllid’s (ACP) history, specifically ACP movement throughout Southern California. Psyllid finds in Central California are mimicking the insect’s history of spread. University of California, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources held it’s California Asian Citrus Psyllid and Huanglongbing Research and Extension Summit at UC Riverside. The summit was …

georgia

‘The Psyllids Will Like Georgia Just Fine’

Daniel CooperGeorgia, Psyllids

A California citrus leader believes Georgia will make an ideal home for the Asian citrus psyllid, which vectors the devastating huanglongbing (HLB) disease. “North of Florida, it is colder, and it’s certainly not as suitable a place as Florida is, but the psyllid is still going to be fine. The cold isn’t long enough here to knock the populations out,” …

mexican

Mexican Organic Orchards Offer Better Psyllid Control

Daniel CooperHLB Management, Mexico, Organic

A wider diversity of weeds and insects in organic Mexican citrus orchards compared to conventional orchards aids in control of the HLB-spreading Asian citrus psyllid (ACP/Diaphorina citri), a Mexican scientist reported recently. HLB is also known as citrus greening disease.  “In the organic orchard, there are almost double the species of weeds compared to the conventional orchard,” Carlos Castillejos Cruz …

cycle 2

California’s CRaFT Accepting Cycle 2 Applications

Daniel CooperCalifornia Corner, Psyllids

California’s Citrus Research and Field Trials (CA-CRaFT) program is now accepting Cycle 2 applications from commercial growers. This initiative aims to showcase the efficacy of additional control measures against the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). ACP is the carrier of the Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus bacterium causing huanglongbing (HLB) disease in citrus. For Cycle 2, applications will be accepted until program capacity …

psyllids

New Discovery About Asian Citrus Psyllids

Daniel CooperHLB Management, Psyllids, Research

A failed field test has led to a major discovery about Asian citrus psyllids (ACP). According to new research, the bacterium that causes HLB disease can interfere with ACP’s sense of smell, rendering some kinds of insect traps useless. The work is currently available as a preprint. HLB, also known as citrus greening, is caused by the Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) bacterium. …

How Mexico Has Dealt With HLB

Tacy CalliesHLB Management, Mexico

Mexico’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development recently pointed out ways the country has successfully dealt with huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. The ministry reported that the disease has triggered socioeconomic problems in other citrus-producing countries and regions in the Americas, Africa and Asia. “With appropriate agronomic-phytosanitary management, the life of affected trees can be prolonged, …

Mulch Suppresses Psyllids in Young Trees 

Tacy CalliesPsyllids, Tip of the Week

By Jawwad A. Qureshi, Lauren Diepenbrock and Davie Kadyampakeni  Protecting citrus trees from the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is critical to reducing the spread and severity of huanglongbing (HLB) disease. The frequent availability of viable shoots in young trees is attractive to psyllid colonization, feeding and oviposition events. UV-metalized reflective mulches reflect ultraviolet light, which is disturbing for some insects …

pesticide resistance

Preventing Pesticide Resistance

Daniel CooperPesticides, Pests

By Lourdes Pérez Cordero Insects in general are often thought of as pests. Although some organisms of the class Insecta can become harmful to important agricultural crops, not all insects should inherently be considered pests. A pest can be any organism that competes, injures, or spreads diseases to humans, domestic animals and desired plants. Historically, humans have utilized chemical mixtures …

insecticide

Timing Insecticide Applications for Best Effects

Daniel CooperPests, Tip of the Week

By Lukasz Stelinski Here are some basic guidelines that growers can follow to manage pests successfully and economically in their groves: Take-home messages include the following: Lukasz Stelinski is a professor at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred. Sponsored Content5 Facts About Fire Ants and How to Control ThemApril …

requirements

HLB Quarantine Requirements Updated for California

Daniel CooperCalifornia Corner, HLB Management, Regulation

California’s Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Division (CPDPD) has officially updated the requirements for moving bulk citrus fruit within and from a huanglongbing (HLB) quarantine area to a packer/processor. CPDPD is part of the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Here’s an overview of the newly updated requirements, per the CPDPD’s Citrus Grower/Grove Manager Information page: All fruit, no matter …