CUPS Can Be More Profitable Than Conventional Production

Jim Rogers CUPS, Economics, Research

High yields of HLB-free fruit can hypothetically be sustainably produced in citrus under protective screen (CUPS), Arnold Schumann said at a Dec. 14 field day at the Citrus Research and Education Center (CREC). He backed that up with data showing high yields from Ray Ruby grapefruit planted at high densities and fertigated in CUPS. Trees in his CUPS facility are …

Economic Perspectives on the 2021–22 Florida Processed Orange Season

Jim Rogers Economics

By Thomas H. Spreen The timing of Hurricane Ian is not unlike that of Hurricane Irma in September of 2017 in that it struck before the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) crop forecast was released in October, but after the data collection process was already completed for the forecast. Therefore, the USDA forecast will not take Hurricane Ian’s impacts into …

Ian/Nicole Overlap Complicates Loss Assessments

Jim Rogers Economics, hurricane

Nicole, which came ashore as a hurricane on Nov. 10 before weakening to a tropical storm, impacted much of the same Florida land area that Hurricane Ian damaged in late September. Christa Court, director of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Economic Impact Analysis Program, says due to that overlap, the data her team references …

Hurricane Ian Citrus Damages Could Hit $675 Million

Jim Rogers Economics, hurricane

Total Florida citrus crop and tree losses from Hurricane Ian are estimated to be from $417 million to $675 million by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). FDACS’ Hurricane Ian’s Preliminary Estimates of Damage to Florida Agriculture report echoed a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) preliminary assessment of $147 million to $304 …

Preliminary Assessment of Hurricane Ian Citrus Loss

Jim Rogers Economics, hurricane

Florida citrus likely suffered production losses ranging from $147 million to $304 million due to Hurricane Ian, according to the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS). The preliminary assessment was issued Oct. 17 by the UF/IFAS Food and Resource Economics Department. “This estimate only accounts for production losses, or changes in expected revenues for the current …

Consumer Responses to High Grocery Prices

Jim Rogers Economics, Florida Department of Citrus, Orange Juice

By Marisa L. Zansler and Lijun (Angelia) Chen Throughout 2022, consumer demand for goods and services remained strong despite the highest rate of inflation in 40 years. Many Americans resumed leisure travel and purchased luxury items, such as new cars. Movement of Florida citrus products remained near 2019 levels. Consumers were spending vigorously at grocery stores even as prices increased. …

When Are Cover Crops Profitable?

Jim Rogers Cover Crops, Economics, Research

At 200 boxes per acre, cover crops can be profitable in Valencia orange production, according to a Citrus & Specialty Crop Expo presentation. Tara Wade and Shourish Chakravarty prepared the presentation. Wade is an assistant professor, and Chakravarty is a post-doctoral associate, both at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Southwest Florida Research and Education Center. …

Are Cover Crops Economically Feasible?

Jim Rogers Cover Crops, Economics, Research

Although researchers cited numerous advantages of cover crops during a virtual seminar on June 23, it likely will take more time to determine if they are economically worthwhile. Near the end of the seminar, economists showed a slide stating, “Cover crops could be an economically feasible practice in citrus production.” But an audience member seemed to question that statement by …

Inflation Impacts OJ Consumers

Jim Rogers Economics, Florida Department of Citrus, Orange Juice

Florida Department of Citrus (FDOC) economist Marisa Zansler discussed orange juice (OJ) volume movement and the potential impacts inflation may have on the category at the May 18 Florida Citrus Commission meeting. She also addressed the importance of ongoing marketing activities to support sales even as supply constraints continue. Inflation is persistently up across all goods, with shelter, food, airline …

Floridians Worry About Economic Outlook

Jim Rogers Economics, Florida

Jerry Parrish, an economist with Florida State University, returned to speak at the annual Lay of the Land Conference last month in Lakeland, Florida. Parrish is always a popular speaker for his big-picture economic outlook and engaging style. He is not a dull economist. Parrish said the major themes to watch for in 2022 are the Federal Reserve interest rates; …

An Opportunity for Florida’s Agricultural Landowners

Jim Rogers Economics, Florida, Land

It was a good time to be in the real estate business in Florida in 2021. That was a common theme coming out of the annual Lay of the Land Conference held in Lakeland, Florida, in April. The conference is hosted by SVN | Saunders Ralston Dantzler Real Estate. Some real estate sectors have moved through the COVID-19 pandemic better …

Let’s Talk About CUPS

Jim Rogers CUPS, Economics, Florida Department of Citrus

By Thomas H. Spreen Citrus under protective screen (CUPS) is a relatively new technology being adopted to help spur expansion of fresh citrus production in Florida. Large screen houses (approximately 10 acres) are constructed. In the current arrangement, several screen houses are located together to facilitate caretaking and harvest. Trees are planted at high densities (more than 300 trees per …

Consequences of Skyrocketing Fertilizer Prices

Jim Rogers Economics, Nutrition

By Ariel Singerman and Stephen H. Futch Chemical input prices have increased significantly over the last year. In particular, the price of fertilizer has roughly doubled during the last 12 months, as denoted by Figure 1. Figure 1. Producer Price Index of Nitrogenous Fertilizer Manufacturing Source: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Supply and demand factors help explain such an …

Grower Associations Object to H-2A Wage Methodology

Tacy Callies Economics, Labor

Florida Citrus Mutual recently published the following statement about comments it submitted regarding the wage rate for temporary foreign H-2A workers: “On January 31, 2022, Florida Citrus Mutual, along with many other agricultural entities nationwide, submitted comments to the United States Department of Labor (USDOL) in reference to the proposed changes to the methodology for the adverse effect wage rate …

Fertilizer Price Spike Highest Since Great Recession

Jim Rogers Economics, Regulation

During January’s Southeast Regional Fruit & Vegetable Conference in Savannah, Georgia, Daniel Tregeagle, an Extension economist with North Carolina State University, gave a presentation on economic and regulatory trends impacting citrus and specialty crop growers. MODEST MARKET GROWTHThe biggest blip on the proverbial economic radar has been COVID-19 and its continuing effects. Tregeagle noted these impacts mostly will be transient, …

Early Performance of Orange Rootstocks in Commercial Settings

Tacy Callies Economics, Rootstocks

By Ariel Singerman, Stephen H. Futch and Brandon Page This article provides estimates on the performance of different rootstocks grafted with Valencia sweet orange scions in commercial field conditions. These are the first estimates obtained from side-by-side trials that compare the performance of rootstocks developed by two breeding programs: The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) …

Orange Establishment and Production Costs

Len Wilcox California Corner, Economics

The costs of establishing and producing oranges in the San Joaquin Valley and the potential returns are the subjects of a new study by University of California (UC) specialists.  Conducted by UC Agriculture and Natural Resources, UC Cooperative Extension and the UC Davis Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, the study includes information on the production of navel oranges using …

Florida Break-Even Yields and Prices

Tacy Callies Economics, Tip of the Week

By Ariel Singerman For processed oranges grown in Southwest Florida during 2020–21, the estimated cultural costs were $1,508 per acre. Total costs of production were $1,882 per acre. Those estimates are down $214 per acre compared to the previous season. This is the result of growers reducing costs across all grove programs, except for fungicides and irrigation. Such a cutback …